Monday, October 29, 2012

Privacy Window Film Tutorial

My sister recently bought a new house (full tour to come soon) and they are slowly working on making it "theirs." The other day I drove up for a visit and noticed that you could see all the clothes hanging in her laundry room from outside the house. Uh, not what she wants the whole neighborhood to see! I told her that they make privacy window film that would still let light come in, but prevent her neighbors from seeing their laundry. She didn't hesitate to have me to work on this project for her.

She had already taken down her laundry before I took this shot, but you can get a little peek inside the arched window. (Sorry for all the phone pics, I forgot to bring my good camera.)


This is the view from inside the laundry room.


I pretty much followed Young House Love's directions from when they used a similar product on their first house's basement windows and door. My brother-in-law picked up a plain frosted film and a textured film. We decided to use the plain one on the window and we'll use the textured one on the sidelights of the front door at a later time.


First thing to do is trace around the window and cut out a piece of the film, about an inch or two wider all around.

Next, spray the window with a solution of water and a little dishwashing detergent. I had a GILA Window Film Kit from when I had done this to a window in my own home so that is what I used. Spray liberally!


I couldn't get a picture of the next step, but you just peel back the paper from the film and place it over the window. Because you cut it bigger, it doesn't need to be lined up perfectly, because you will trim the excess anyway. Just do your best to center it and you should be fine.

Use the "squeegie" from the kit or any old credit card will do, and starting from the center, smooth it across to the outer edges to get out all the air bubbles. Don't worry if the edges aren't completely flat yet.


After the film is smooth, use a razor blade (your own or from the kit), and get in real close to the window frame. Get in to the space right where the glass meets the frame and carefully slide your razor blade and slice off the excess.


After: privacy + light!


It's not totally opaque so you can see shadows when something is directly in front of the window, but all least her neighbors won't get a free show anymore!

And since we all love a good before and after:


Another quick and easy project with lots of impact!


p.s. I'll be linking up with Sherry, Katie, Sarah and Carmel as part of the Fall Pinterest Party.

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Linking up:
Home Stories A to Z | House on the Way | House of Hepworths | At the Picket Fence |

13 comments:

  1. that looks great, but it's a shame you can't see out that lovely view. or maybe it's just me that likes the idea of lurking a bit out of sight, lol. great diy tips.

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  2. Great tips! I need to do this for exactly the same reason! My laundry room is right off the back of the house and well, everyone can see in. I'd love for you to share at my party! http://www.addhousewife.com/2012/10/pin-inspiration-1101.html

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  3. Gorgeous!! This is such great information about windows film.. Thank you so much for sharing!
    Security Window Film

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  4. Great idea and solution, i have learn new ideas..


    campbell window film

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  6. I can see the difference, Lori! Though it feels good to have an easy view of the outside from your windows, too much sunlight can be hurtful to the eyes, especially in the afternoon. And seeing the result of the project, it created a cozy and more private ambiance to the living room.

    Greg Arnett

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  8. First of all, it looks like you're in a beautiful neighborhood. We did the same thing to some of our windows. It went faster than I expected, and I love the look and security of it.

    Steve Carter | http://www.solchek.com.au/security-films/security-film-benefits

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  9. Where did you get the window film? I love it!

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  10. Rebecca, the film is from Home Depot but you can probably find it on amazon, Lowes, and other retailers.

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  11. Your sister's home is so beautiful dear, I like it so much.

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